Read “Biological Warfare against Crops” What’s the message, the bottom line that Rogers et al. are attempting to convey? Do you think America’s crops are in harms way?

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Part A. Read “Biological Warfare against Crops” What’s the message, the bottom line that Rogers et al. are attempting to convey? Do you think America’s crops are in harms way? If so, what plan would you like to proffer to help protect them? BTW, name an infectious agent that could target America’s crops. Mention to the class how it works (e.g., at the seed stage, in the field, during harvest). No duplicate submissions, please, if possible. Also, what in the world is a ‘feather bomb?’ What could such bombs target? Does anyone know when these bombs were first used? Hint: it’s earlier than the 1950s.
Part B. Consider the following: There seems to be a lot of controversy about what interest the terrorists of 9/11 had in crop-dusters. According to the FBI, Mohammed Atta and several others made repeated visits to a crop-dusting airfield in Florida and had many questions of Willie Lee, the chief pilot and general manager of South Florida Crop Care in Belle Glade about plane operation. Atta was ‘very persistent about wanting to know how much the airplane will haul, how fast it will go, what kind of range it has’, according to what Mr. Lee reported to the FBI. Some say the terrorist’s interests were simply to fly these planes into buildings; others say it was more about planning a biological attack on crops or cities. Some say they just wanted to learn how to fly smaller planes and enjoy the pleasant view of the Everglades National Park. What do you think?
Therefore, please provide your responses in two or three succinct, carefully written paragraphs. For full credit, please interact and respond to others in this conference —it’s critical for our newly evolving learning ecology.

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