The tax agency fund of Fulton County collected $6,000,000 for a school district, $3,000,000 for the county general fund, and $4,000,000 for a municipality.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

The tax agency fund of Fulton County collected $6,000,000 for a school district, $3,000,000 for the county general fund, and $4,000,000 for a municipality. County general fund employees handle the collections and a 3% percent collection fee is charged all units except the county. The total amount of revenue recognized by the county general fund would be:
A. $2,910,000
B. $3,000,000
C. $3,090,000
D. $3,300,000

Write a brief essay discussing the potential liability in this case and the potential defenses that might be used by all the parties.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Dawn is a driver for Fast as We Can Delivery. She is a long‐time employee and has the use of her delivery vehicle to get her to and from work. One evening after she completed her shift, Dawn is asked by her supervisor, Ian Smart, to drop off a special package at the DNA Laboratories, a research institute funded by the state. Rather than driving straight to DNA after work, Dawn stops at a supermarket to pick up a few things she needs at home. After leaving the supermarket and on the way to DNA, Dawn’s vehicle is involved in an accident with Mr. Dewey Cheatum. Mr. Cheatum seeks to bring an action against Dawn, DNA Labs, and Fast as We Can Deliver.

Write a brief essay discussing the potential liability in this case and the potential defenses that might be used by all the parties.

Consider the following in developing your answer:

• Agency: Employer
• Employee relationship
• Scope of Employment
• Respondeat Superior
• Detour

min 200 words.

Explain which type of intelligence you think is most important to counterterrorism operations and why.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Briefly describe the different types of intelligence (HUMIT, SIGNIT, OSINT, MASINT, GEOINT, and IMINT) and explain how each type of intelligence fits into the U. S. intelligence framework. Explain which type of intelligence you think is most important to counterterrorism operations and why. 250-300 words in length. Please support your claims with examples from the required and/or recommended material and/or scholarly articles. Just a simple write up.

Which of the following would be TRUE? A. The County would report the $112 million in an investment trust fund and the$17 million in a permanent fund.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

The County of Churchville is trustee for a multi-government investment pool and has established an investment trust fund. Included in the investment trust fund, for management purposes, are investments in the amount of $15 million from the County’s General Fund, $2 million from the County’s special revenue funds, and $112 million from other governments. Which of the following would be TRUE?
A. The County would report the $112 million in an investment trust fund and the$17 million in a permanent fund.
B. The County would report the $112 million in an investment trust fund, the $15 million in its General Fund, and the $2 million in special revenue funds.
C. The County would report the entire $129 million in an investment trust fund.
D. The County would report the entire $17 million in an investment trust fund.

A government incurred expenses for its infrastructure as follows: $15 million for general repairs; $13 million to extend the life for of existing infrastructure; and $12 million for additions and betterments.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

A government incurred expenses for its infrastructure as follows: $15 million for general repairs; $13 million to extend the life for of existing infrastructure; and $12 million for additions and betterments. The government chooses to use the modified approach to record infrastructure. The infrastructure has a basis of $400 million and would be depreciated over a 40 year life, if depreciation were charged. The amount that would be shown as expense in the Statement of Activities would be:
A. $40 million
B. $28 million
C. $27 million
D. $25 million

Consider the most recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Describe the various mechanisms and pathways that toxins transport to the environment. What can be done to remove the toxins from the environment?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Consider the most recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Describe the various mechanisms and pathways that toxins transport to the environment. What can be done to remove the toxins from the environment?

What is Philosophy? As you already know, the word means “love of wisdom” and refers to the study of the principles underlying conduct, thought, knowledge, and the nature of the universe.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Movements and Trends in Western Thought: Part 1
Donald E. Stelting, Ph.D. and Janice L. Duce, M.Div.
This week we will place the study of Philosophy into a historical framework. What is Philosophy? As you already know, the word means “love of wisdom” and refers to the study of the principles underlying conduct, thought, knowledge, and the nature of the universe. For the philosophers and schools of philosophy we will be discussing here, each has tried to give attention to the “large questions” of philosophy, organized around three primary concepts or considerations. These are:
• Metaphysics: What is real?
• Epistemology: How do we know? Or: How can we know? Or: What is true?
• Axiology: What is good, valuable, or beautiful?
Also, an abiding question with philosophers concerns human nature. Are persons naturally good (or innocent) or evil (bad)? The way each would answer that question becomes an assumption that flavors all their subsequent thought. A related question has to do with the source of evil, or the nature of evil. (Stelting, screen 1 )
An outline of the historical context for western philosophy:
1. Classical Greek Philosophy @400 B.C. until @100 A.D. Socrates, Plato, Aristotle
2. Synthetic Christian Philosophy @100 until @ 1650
1. The Platonic and Neo Platonic period @100 until @1250
2. The Thomastic period @1250 until @1650 (perhaps the present for some)
3. The Enlightenment @1650 until 1850
4. Modern to Postmodern @1850 to present
This Lecture will focus on Classical Greek Philosophy, Synthetic Christian Philosophy and The Enlightenment. The Modern to Postmodern will be in Part II, the next lecture.
1. Classical Greek Philosophy (This section only, is taken from the Stelting lecture, “The Language and History of Philosophy”)
Most scholars consider three persons to have been the fathers of philosophy. In an overarching sense, these three men, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, introduced the primary features for philosophy. Greek philosophy is usually considered to be divided in time by the life of Socrates (469-399 BC). Before Socrates, Greek philosophy was largely preoccupied by the questions of the nature (the basic character) of the physical world. This part of philosophy is today the study of the physical sciences. With Socrates, in the writings of Plato, philosophy became interested in the nature of reality and of the nature of humankind. Hence the use of the term “metaphysics” or the study of what is beyond (after) or what underlies the physical world. We have no record of anything written by Socrates, but we do have the writings of Plato (428-348 B.C.), the student of Socrates. In fact, Socrates was the primary character in the writings of Plato.
Plato and (by extension) Socrates held that the idea, or forms are more real than the material thing corresponding to the idea. For example, before the “material” tree is the “idea” of the tree. While the material tree is temporal, imperfect, and limited, the “ideal” tree is eternal, perfect, and unlimited. Therefore, the idea is superior – that is, “prior” – to the material/physical manifestation of the idea.
Where do ideas come from? Plato would say that they have always existed – they are eternal (including pre-existence). In fact, we are born with these ideas in our minds. Education is the process by which we connect our direct consciousness with the memory of ideas that are in the mind from birth.
What about human nature? Plato, speaking for Socrates, would say that man is basically good or innocent; that evil is nothing but ignorance. “No one would knowingly do evil.” As we connect with ideas of proper conduct, we will see the wisdom and profit of doing what is right. Right conduct is in line with the very ideal nature of reality and is very practical. However, right conduct does not flow from the nature of god or the gods, it is rather within the fabric of the universe. Good is not necessarily safe, however. Ignorant men can do evil to good people because they are threatened by the critique of their actions.
The perfect society, Plato would say, could exist only if people accept their own roles in life, contributing to the health of the community. Different people have different roles based on their personal nature. Philosophers are the best rulers because, while they are the wisest of all, they do not want to rule, but are willing to accept that task out of obligation to the truth. Education is, ultimately, the most important tool toward the perfect society. Plato started what is considered by many to be the first “university” in western culture.
Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) was Plato’s student but differed from him in many ways. Aristotle emphasized that physical things were the most real, and that ideas were just categories by which we group things. For example, we got the idea of “tree” because we experienced a physical tree – in fact, because we saw enough trees we came to understand that there exists a category called “tree” or tree-ness. Henceforth we are able to recognize a new tree because it conforms to the category or idea we have come to know as “tree.”
Where do ideas come from then? Aristotle would say ideas come from direct experience with physical things. We still use our minds to order, consider, and categorize these ideas, but the ideas come from our senses, from our experiences. While Plato would say that ideas are the most real of all substance, Aristotle would say that an idea has no substance of its own, it has no independent existence except as we relate it to the material things we experience.
What about human nature? Aristotle would say that human nature is basically innocent. A person is what experience makes of the person. Aristotle was firmly committed to the workings of cause and effect. Nothing exists without a prior cause. Therefore everything we are is the result of previous causation.
Where do you arrive if you assume a previous cause to a previous cause to a previous cause, etc.? You eventually come back to God, who is, according to Aristotle, the First Cause. The First Cause is the Uncaused Cause; He is the Unmoved Mover. Aristotle’s God is impersonal force, the Beginning of a long chain of cause and effect reaching from the very beginning until now.
What about evil? Evil is refusing to accept the universe as it is – as God has designed it to be. Hence, evil is largely ignorance, but contains an element of human rebellion. The perfect society could occur if humanity would come to accept the universe as it is and fall in line with the orderly flow of everything. Moral agency exists in that we may choose to follow the course of nature, or rather choose to fight against it, which will eventually fail.
2. Synthetic Christian Philosophy
In tracing the contours of this period, one philosopher has commented: “It is impossible to treat the philosophy of the so-called Middle ages like that of any other period. We are concerned in effect with a period lasting for ten centuries or more, depending on where one thinks it begins and ends” (Hamlyn 91). It is a period characterized by two main elements. First, it was backward looking as it looked to the giants of Greek Classical philosophy, even though after around the sixth century A.D. a direct knowledge of Greek was lacking in significant ways in the West. (Hamlyn 91, 96) Second, philosophy became subordinate to Christianity. Although a distinction remained between theology and philosophy, as well as faith and reason, this period is characterized as one in which a synthesis was sought between philosophy and theology (Solomon and Higgins, 79). This era of Christian Philosophy that we will explore here from about 100 A.D to about 1650 can be divided into the Neo-Platonism period of about 100 to 1250 and the Thomistic period from about 1250 to 1650. Although in some senses Thomism (named for Thomas Aquinas) persists as a strong influence until this day.
The Platonic and Neo Platonic period @100 until @1250
Later interpreters of Plato, called Neo-Platonist had a philosophical influence in the second century on Christian thought. It also for many centuries had significant influence on Islamic thought when that world religion arose many centuries later. Two aspects of Platonism that appealed the most to the Neo-Platonist was its tendency toward transcendence and a type of anti-rationalism which insisted that the most important truths were beyond concepts articulated by reason (Jones 7). They emphasized Plato’s contention that the world of the senses was inferior. This worked well with the mood of the age in the West in the third century A.D. They sought for a truth beyond reason (Jones 7). This trend toward otherworldliness reinforced a desire to find a vision of another and better world. (7-8). Hence some found this need answered in Christianity and articulated this in Christian Neo-Platonism forms and some found it in the mystery cults of the time. The most influential Neo-Platonist thinker was Plotinus (204-270 A.D.).
In the early centuries of the church, it became very important to formulate a coherent body of doctrine. This is why it was often dominated by a series of struggles to eliminate heresy and establish an orthodox faith. Therefore, philosophy and theology traveled the road together for a long time together during this period. Augustine (354-430 A.D.) played an important role in this. As he sought to minister to the world around him, he wrote to explain why God had allowed Rome to fall to the barbarians. As he wrote he addressed issues having to do with God’s infinitude and humankind’s finitude; God being omnipotent and whether or not humankind really had free will (Jones xviii). For centuries after the death of Augustine “there was little philosophical activity-these were dark ages indeed” (Jones xviii).
Philosophy and theology continued to travel the road of inquiry together throughout the medieval period in the continuous, passionate pursuit of an understanding of the nature of the world and how the faith should relate to it. With the founding of universities in Western Europe, learning and culture was thriving at an ever increasing level along these lines. The church and the university pursued this vigorously together and in so doing solidified an institution which by the end of this very long period had moved from the simplicity and otherworldliness of the earlier centuries to being very much this-worldly in terms of becoming an institution of great social and political influence and power (Jones xviii).
The Thomastic period @1250 until @1650
Philosophical speculation during this part of the medieval period concentrated on the status of universals and “defining and delimiting the respective spheres of faith and reason” (Jones xviii). Universals had to do with truths or propositions which are existent or operative everywhere, under all conditions at all times, or truth which is comprehensively broad and versatile (Webster 1291). The interaction of faith and reason was a paramount concern. One great scholar, of the early medieval period, named Anselm had said just a century or two before “It seems to me a case of negligence if, after becoming firm in our faith, we do not strive to understand what we believe” (Tarnas 177). In order to accomplish these tasks, the philosopher/theologians of this period, known as Scholastics, devised and refined the instruments of logical analysis.
The term “Thomastic” or “Thomist” refers to the great Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) who put together a synthesis of classical learning and Christian insights (hence the title of this section), so that a traditional Christian viewpoint of the divine nature of God was described or understood primarily, yet not exclusively, in Aristotelian concepts of matter, actuality and potentiality (Jones xviii). The vast influence of Aquinas in formulating theology and philosophy in a form which utilized Aristotle cannot be overstated. His mark on traditional Roman Catholic theology and some aspects of 20th century fundamentalism is still significant. For Aquinas, like Aristotle, the belief has been that we know concrete things, and from this, we posit universals. (Tarnas 185).
After Aquinas, philosophers turned from large-scale synthesis to analysis of relatively small-scale technical problems. Some tended to be more empirically oriented; others were logicians refining the methods of Aquinas (Jones xviii). However, to understand medieval Scholastic thinking it is important to understand for all persons, whether claiming to lean toward Plato or Aristotle, that logical analysis, no matter how acute, operated within limits set up for it by transcendent truths. These truths always determined the parameters of reason. The historian of philosophy, W.T. Jones states with regard to this: “The ultimate criterion for all knowledge and the ultimate sanction for all conduct was not the concurrence of human minds guided by reason but the authority of a divinely inspired text and a divinely established institution” (Jones xviii).
Another use of the term “synthesis” for this period has been called the “Medieval Synthesis.” Somewhat related to the Thomist synthesis described above, was the concept that all of life was united by a common world view of order, certainty and serenity. This world was seen as a reflection of a greater, divine invisible, reality.
This world view was challenged during the period of the Renaissance and Reformation of the 16th century. Medieval philosophy, with its emphasis on an infinite God and finite humankind did not satisfy humanity at the time of the Renaissance. This is not to say that the concept of an infinite God was rejected, only an emphasis shifted. As W.T. Jones comments regarding this shift: “Shaped by capitalism and the new money power, by the idea of sovereignty and the ideals of Humanism, by discovery of America and the Protestant reformation, this new man was an individual increasingly concerned with the world and its values” (Jones xvii). Philosophy at this time entered “a period that saw the flowering of much else-of science, of art and of literature-was a period in which philosophy was at a low ebb” (Hamlyn 123). As classical/Greek philosophy had been taken over by the Christian’s insistence on theocentrism,(God-centered thought and reflection), Medieval philosophy was overthrown in this period by scientist’s discovery of nature (Jones xvii). The mind set of humankind was one of “penetrating and reflecting nature’s secrets,” “immensely expanding the known world,” and the tendency to “defy traditional authorities and assert a truth based on his own judgment” (Tarnas 224).
This is actually the milieu into which the Protestant Reformation came forth. To view the Protestant Reformation as mainly a religious movement is correct. But to assume that it happened in a vacuum is but a limited understanding of the impact of the cultural, political, social and philosophical environment which gave rise to it. The Protestant Reformation reflected the significant philosophical and social movements of the time, notably humanism.and.nationalism. For our purposes we will focus here on humanism, which is certainly not to be equated with secular humanism. Instead, a better description of its meaning begins with looking at an atmosphere of the scholarly humaista of Italy. These persons were rediscovering the accomplishment of the human spirit. Within this was the discovery and interest in the original languages of the ancients, for Classical literature, as well as embracing a perspective of the free investigation of things outside of the mode of church authority. It was a time in which scholars like Erasmus, Luther and later Calvin studied the original manuscripts of the Scriptures often asking questions and answering them in a way in which the authority of the Medieval Church was called into question.
3. The Enlightenment @1650 until 1850
Historian Tarnas says of this period: “The Scientific Revolution was both the final expression of the Renaissance and its definitive contribution to the modern world view”(Tarnas 248). The term “Enlightenment” for this period, is more accurately applied to the late 1700s. However, we will use it to describe a period starting around 1650 when the use of the scientific method was in full swing. Others have also called this period an age of reason, or of rationalism. The most pervasive characteristic was a common opposition to any truth or claim to knowledge based solely on authority (Surber 24). The three main sources of authority had been: the church, the state, and Greco-Roman antiquity. The major objective became that of overcoming “medieval barbarianism” with a vision of culture and civilization which was progressive beyond traditional authority (25). The story of this era, involves the major thinkers of the Enlightenment, reaction to the Enlightenment, and then other important movements which emerged after this reaction.
Five figures of note, briefly mentioned here, illustrated ideas which were taking root before the Enlightenment, flourishing during this period, and continued to have influence afterward. The first of these figures was Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) who wholeheartedly adopted the new scientific world view (Jones xviii). W.T. Jones summarizes: “Only matter in motion exists; men’s thoughts and desires are but the by-products of motions occurring in their cortices and caused by events in the physical environment. It follows that there are no metaphysically based standards by which to determine the objective truth or the true value of desires” (Jones xviii). Therefore, there needed to be a sovereign in the human realm that would establish clear authority in order to maintain what is good and true (Jones xviii).
Second, was Rene Descartes (1596-1650) whose method of thought could be described as beginning by a person holding God and the world around them in suspicion. From there, one was to use the method of deduction, in which every principle must be derived or ‘deduced’ from prior principles which have already been established on the basis of other principles or premises. Ultimately, all principles must be derived from a fundamental set of axioms and definitions that are self evident. The axiom which served as a premise that is beyond all doubt was the famous line of Descartes “I think, therefore I am.” Descartes also believed that he could prove God’s existence by this means: “It is impossible that the idea of God which is in us should not have God himself as its cause” (Solomon and Higgins 181-183).
Third, was John Locke (1632-1704) who had a different approach to wrestling with the philosophical problems of the time. Jones sums it up: “Instead of dismissing perception as unreliable and holding that pure reason can work out a correct metaphysical solution, he held that the concepts of reason must meet the test of what he called ‘the historical plain method’-that is, they must be verified in sense experience” (Jones xviii).
Fourth was David Hume (1711-1776), in whose hands the Cartesian system (meaning Descartes above) was shaken in the minds of some. His rugged empirical criterion produced a philosophy of thoroughgoing skepticism. It was not only a skepticism toward religion and the existence of God, but toward the optimism of the rationality of the Enlightenment, and even the optimism of scientific reason. As one historian comments: “Hume tended toward naturalism, to the idea that what reason could not do, nature would do for us anyway. If reason cannot guarantee us knowledge, nature nevertheless provides us with the good sense to make our way in the world. If reason cannot guarantee morals, our human natures nevertheless supply us with adequate sentiments to behave reasonably toward one another” (Solomon and Higgins 197).
Fifth was Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) another philosopher of the Enlightenment period, who could easily be identified as the most important figure of this period. W.T. Jones writes: “Kant recognized the destructive potential of Hume’s critique; one of the main drives that animated his thought was the desire to answer Hume’s criticisms of the claims of science and to show that an a priori knowledge of nature is possible” (Jones 379). For something to be a priori, is for it to be known independently of sense perception and for this reason held to be beyond question (Jones xx). What Kant did was to distinguish the realm of experience from that which transcends experience, called “metaphysics.” The latter had come to be rejected by those such as Hume mostly because the test of truth is agreement of the mind with an external object or what can be “proven externally.” But as Tarnas, explains, in Kant’s view: “All human cognition of the world is channeled through the human mind’s categories. The necessity and certainty of scientific knowledge derive from the mind, and are embedded in the mind’s perception and understanding of the world. They do not derive from nature independent of the mind. Observations alone do not give man certain laws; rather, those laws reflect the laws of man’s mental organization. In the act of human cognition, the mind does not conform to things; rather, things conform to the mind” (Tarnas 343).
As the 1800’s dawned reactions to the Enlightenment in general continued as the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution did not deliver on all their promises of a tidy, rational and better world. The type of humanity which emerged in the nineteenth century was very different and rejected the optimism of humanity found during the Renaissance, and then the Enlightenment. The new humanity of the nineteenth century was increasingly unsure of themselves-doubtful of the validity of their values, of their ability to communicate in a meaningful way with others, and of their ability even to know themselves (Jones 10).
4. Modern to Postmodern @1850 to present
As we end this section taking us up to the middle of the nineteenth century, therefore, we will look at three major movements which emerged in the nineteenth century which began to focus on dealing with new questions and the concerns of nineteenth century humanity. These were Romanticism, Utilitarianism, and Modern Materialism. Some were rejections of the basic tenets of the Enlightenment; some carried these tenets forward in new directions.
First, the most radical departure or reaction to the Enlightenment was the literary and intellectual movement know as Romanticism. This movement was a varied, somewhat wide and complex phenomenon. As with every other thinker and movement in this lecture, it will only be touched upon here covering some essential elements. Basically, this movement reacted to the aspects of the Enlightenment which had established a conviction about order, rule, measure, “both in the universe at large and in man, in particular, everything can be neatly pigeonholed and labeled” (Jones 102). To the Romantic mind set (I hope you understand that we are not simply talking about people’s love lives, but a serious intellectual movement.) the universe seemed bigger, richer, more varied and exciting and more of “a unity than the thinkers of the Age of Reason had allowed” (Jones 102). The focus of the attack was against reason. “To the Romantic mind, the distinctions that reason makes are artificial, imposed….they divide and in dividing destroy, the living whole of reality, hence the battle cry: ‘We murder to dissect'” (Jones 102). The way to get in touch with the real, according to the Romantic was for one to divest themselves in the “whole apparatus of learning” by becoming like children, or simple uneducated humankind and by attending to nature in contemplation and communion rather than by the scientific method. (Jones 102). The Romantics were also unique in their concept of reality, a reality disclosed in being at one with nature, or in the “rapt contemplation of a beautiful work of art … ” (Jones 105).
Second there was Utilitarianism, which instead of reacting against the Enlightenment, carried forth the project of the Age of Reason with the notion that the universe was basically simple and that the mind can fathom its mysteries given enough time and application of the newest developments of scientific methodology. However, their main concern was to apply this methodology to “impose on value-judgments the same criteria that hold in science” (Jones 172). In applying this “moral science” leading Utilitarians, such as the Englishman Jeremy Bentham looked at aspects of English society, and decided that the moral would be that which was most useful to suit the purposes of a moral society based on rational behavior. Morality would be tested by the results it manifested, in much the same manner that a scientific experiment would be performed and its results interpreted
Third, was the development of Materialism, an orientation toward believing that human beings were completely material entities and as such were part of a thoroughly material natural world. During the Enlightenment, a materialistic notion began to be explored, especially with regard to the development of economics and the analysis of human society as the location of materialistic processes which could explain, in their view, the dynamics of society and culture, with human beings and institutions being merely products of these economic and cultural forces (Surber 70).
But it is important to understand the way in which this was at first eclipsed by the German Idealist movement, which also helped, ironically, to give birth to the most important expression of Materialism, in the 1800’s.
After the time of the French Revolution German idealism was taking shape in Germany. This began with Kant, whose ideas are mentioned above. After Kant, G.W.F Hegal (1770-1831) came upon the scene and with his “absolute idealism” turned things in the direction toward shaping into a comprehensive and antimaterialistic philosophical vision (71). It is important to understand that Hegel and others did affirm that a kind of knowledge did arise from experience. But, this yields no valuable or real knowledge unless in comprehending the particular one understands how particular things fit into a general overall concept of things. Thus knowledge is incomplete for the individual, in terms of the knowing subject experiencing various unique and disjointed things. In order for knowledge to be complete, subjective experience must be related to an overarching ideal or universal concept of all things, and all means a comprehensive system (71). But this system is not static, it is dynamic, involving change and process. Here is where the idea of Hegel’s dialectic comes in. Tarnas explains and summarizes: “At the foundation of Hegel’s thought was his understanding of a dialectic, according to which all things unfold in a continuing evolutionary process whereby every state of being inevitably brings forth its opposite. The interaction between these opposites then generates a third stage in which the opposites are integrated-they are at one overcome and fulfilled-in a rich and higher synthesis, which in turn becomes the basis for another dialectical process of opposition and synthesis” (Tarnas 379). Hegel’s philosophical vision was greatly influential for thinkers in many different areas of enquiry as it gave a comprehensive unified outlook on all of reality as being in process. It is also important to note that Hegel did not see this going on into infinity. For him, things ultimately would lead to a higher unity in what religion describes as God. However, this “God” was not necessarily in his view the God of traditional Christianity.
So, what does this have to do Materialism? Influential thinkers who followed Hegel, such as Marx, took Hegel in a different direction. Marx, in whom the ideology of socialism and communism are rooted, “was responsive to the notion of development, a notion that was becoming a major element in the nineteenth century climate of opinion” (Jones 178). He applied this philosophy and his naturalistic view of history to the social forces of history. Tarnas summarizes: “The philosophical, religious and moral values of each age could be plausibly comprehended as determined by economic and political variables, whereby control over the means of production was maintained by the most powerful class. The entire superstructure of human belief could be seen as reflecting the more basic struggle for material power….Class struggle, not civilized progress, was the program of the foreseeable future … ” (Tarnas 329).
With the likes of Marx there was also Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who as modern thinkers “perceived man’s cultural values, psychological motivations, and conscious awareness as historically relative phenomena derived from unconscious political, economic, and instinctual impulses of an entirely naturalistic quality” (Tarnas 329). We briefly mention Darwin here as a part of this intellectual climate because of the far-reaching influence his theories have had. It must be noted, however, that he was not a philosopher or a seminal thinker in terms of the schema of evolutionary thinking. As philosophy historian Jones comments: “…the concept of development was in the air … Darwin felt this interest and focused it on a specific biological problem; in doing so he collected an immense amount of concrete evidence and ‘proved’ … what had been a philosophical hypothesis … this gave great impetus to the use of the concept of development as a general methodological tool” (Jones 192).
Works Cited
Blackburn, Simon. Think: A Compelling Introduction To Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Print.
Earle, William James. Introduction to Philosophy.McGraw-Hill, 1992. Print.
Hamlyn, D.W. The Pelican History of Western Philosophy. New York: Viking Penguin Inc., 1987. Print.
Jones, W.T. The Classical Mind. New York: Harcourt Brace-Jovanovich, Inc, 2nd ed. Vol. 1 of A History of Western Philosophy. 5 vols. 1970. Print.
—. The Medieval Mind. New York: Harcourt Brace-Jovanovich, Inc, 2nd ed. Vol. 2 of A History of Western Philosophy. 5 vols. 1969. Print.
—. Hobbes to Hume. New York: Harcourt Brace-Jovanovich, Inc, 2nd ed. Vol. 3 of A History of Western Philosophy. 5 vols. 1969. Print.
Solomon, Robert C., and Kathleen M. Higgins.A Short History of Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. Print.
Surber, Jere Paul. Culture and Critique: An Introduction to the Critical Discourses of Cultural Studies. Boulder: Westview Press, 1998. Print.
Tarnas, Richard. The Passion of the Western Mind: Understanding the Ideas That Have Shaped Our World View. New York: Ballantine Books, 1991. Print.

Testing at the .01 level of significance if the size of the home is a useful predictor of the selling prices of homes (after accounting for the effect of bedrooms), what is the value of the test statistic?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

“A realtor used the regression model Y =β 0 + β 1X1 + β 2X2 + e to predict selling prices of homes (in the thousands of $). The variable X1 represents home size (square feet) and X2 represents number of bedrooms. The following information is available:

Predictor

Constant: coefficient 26.28 Standard Error 22.88
Size: coefficient 0.12352 Standard Error 0.02435
Bedrooms: coefficient 20.183 Standard Error 6.697

ANOVA
Source DF SS F

Regression: F 293.29
Residual: SS 219.6
Total: DF 10

a. Testing at the .01 level of significance if the size of the home is a useful predictor of the selling prices of homes (after accounting for the effect of bedrooms), what is the value of the test statistic?

Test to see if a house with more bedrooms sells for more.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

“A realtor used the regression model Y =β 0 + β 1X1 + β 2X2 + e to predict selling prices of homes (in the thousands of $). The variable X1 represents home size (square feet) and X2 represents number of bedrooms. The following information is available:

Predictor

Constant: coefficient 26.28 Standard Error 22.88
Size: coefficient 0.12352 Standard Error 0.02435
Bedrooms: coefficient 20.183 Standard Error 6.697

ANOVA
Source DF SS F

Regression: F 293.29
Residual: SS 219.6
Total: DF 10

b. Test to see if a house with more bedrooms sells for more.
(i) State Ho and Ha
(ii) Calculate the value of the test statistic
(iii) What is your conclusion? Use 5% level of significance.

Using the regression results from above what is the predicted selling price of a home with 6 bedrooms and 3200 feet? Is the overall model significant?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

“A realtor used the regression model Y =β 0 + β 1X1 + β 2X2 + e to predict selling prices of homes (in the thousands of $). The variable X1 represents home size (square feet) and X2 represents number of bedrooms. The following information is available:

Predictor

Constant: coefficient 26.28 Standard Error 22.88
Size: coefficient 0.12352 Standard Error 0.02435
Bedrooms: coefficient 20.183 Standard Error 6.697

ANOVA
Source DF SS F

Regression: F 293.29
Residual: SS 219.6
Total: DF 10

c. Using the regression results from above what is the predicted selling price of a home with 6 bedrooms and 3200 feet? Is the overall model significant?

Which of the following is not among the ethical and social challenges facing operations managers?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Which of the following pioneers was not making a professional impact during the Scientific Management Era?

A. Lillian Gilbreth

B. W. Edwards Deming

C. Frederick W. Taylor

D. Henry L. Gantt

E. Frank Gilbreth

Which of the following is not among the ethical and social challenges facing operations managers?

A. providing a safe workplace

B. increasing executive pay

C. efficiently developing and producing safe, quality products

D. maintaining a sustainable environment

E. honoring stakeholder commitments

Which of the following is not one of the Ten Critical Decisions of Operations Management?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Ten high-technology batteries are tested for 200 hours each. One failed at 20 hours; all others completed the test. FR(%) is __________ and MTBF is __________.

A. 10%; 1820 hours

B. cannot calculate from information provided

C. 10%; 1980 hours

D. 10%; 1/1820

E. 90%; 1/1820

The MTBF distribution of a machine that has passed the phase of early failures exhibits a normal distribution. The smaller the standard deviation of this distribution

A. the shorter is the time interval between breakdowns

B. the more likely this machine is a candidate for preventive maintenance

C. the more likely this machine will be maintained by a breakdown maintenance policy

D. the more expensive is preventive maintenance

E. the more likely this machine will break down

Which of the following is not one of the Ten Critical Decisions of Operations Management?

A. design of goods and services

B. human resources and job design

C. managing quality

D. determining the financial leverage position

E. location strategy

Briefly describe whether or not you believe that this person’s philosophy is at all compatible with a Christian worldview.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Out of the lecture: “Movements and Trends in Western Thought: Part 1” note section III. The Enlightenment 1650 until 1850. Citing at least one thinker or movement featured in the lecture, summarize his philosophy, noting especially key words for describing it. Then briefly describe whether or not you believe that this person’s philosophy is at all compatible with a Christian worldview. Be sure that you do some background research beyond the lecture to formulate your answer. Many internet sites will be helpful in constructing your understanding. If you need help to remember what is encapsulated in the idea of worldview, see Cosgrove Chapter 1.

Clean Air Act of 1970a summary of the purpose of the law as it relates to human health and the environment.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Clean Air Act of 1970a summary of the purpose of the law as it relates to human health and the environment.

Most environmental laws passed by the legislative branch result in the enforcing agencies writing regulations that will implement the law. Describe where in the Code of Federal Regulations you would find regulations for Clean Air Act of 1970.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Most environmental laws passed by the legislative branch result in the enforcing agencies writing regulations that will implement the law. Describe where in the Code of Federal Regulations you would find regulations for Clean Air Act of 1970.

What is the basic difference between using a subsidy to induce producers to install antipollution equipment and a tax on producers who pollute?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

What is the basic difference between using a subsidy to induce producers to install antipollution equipment and a tax on producers who pollute?

Discuss the key characteristics of the four basic types of federal agencies: cabinet departments, regulatory agencies, government corporations, and independent executive agencies. Be specific.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Discuss the key characteristics of the four basic types of federal agencies: cabinet departments, regulatory agencies, government corporations, and independent executive agencies. Be specific.

Explain (in some detail) the differences between the “spoils system” and the “merit system” in American political history.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Explain (in some detail) the differences between the “spoils system” and the “merit system” in American political history.

Both Hamlet and Oedipus delayed pursuing their fathers murderers. Compare methods of investigation, use of supernatural, and methods of apprehension and punishment.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Both Hamlet and Oedipus delayed pursuing their fathers murderers. Compare methods of investigation, use of supernatural, and methods of apprehension and punishment.

That is a topic I have for my research paper/annotated bibliography. I need assistance finding credible resources for this topic. There is no limit to sources.

Evaluate the components of a financial statement and the outputs of financial ratio analysis, and determine the single most useful piece of information on which to base future business decisions. Explain your rationale.8

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Evaluate the components of a financial statement and the outputs of financial ratio analysis, and determine the single most useful piece of information on which to base future business decisions. Explain your rationale.

How many participants need to be enrolled in each group to have 90% chance of detecting a significant difference using a two-sided test with a a= .05 if compliance is perfect?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Suppose we assume that the incidence of MI is .005 per year among participants who actually take placebo and that aspirin prevents 20% of MI (i.e. relative risk = p1/p2 = 0.8). We also assume that the duration of the study is 5 years and that the dropout rate in the aspirin group = 10% and the drop-in rate of the placebo group = 5 %.

How many participants need to be enrolled in each group to have 90% chance of detecting a significant difference using a two-sided test with a a= .05 if compliance is perfect?

If the test contains 250 questions, what is the probability that Jodi will score between 70% and 80%? You see that Jodi’s score on the longer test is more likely to be close to her “true score.”

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Multiple-choice tests. Here is a simple probability model for multiple-choice tests. Suppose that each student has probability p of correctly answering a question chosen at random from a universe of possible questions. (A strong student has a higher p than a weak student.) Answers to different questions are independent.

(a) Jodi is a good student for whom p = 0.75. Use the Normal approximation to find the probability that Jodi scores between 70% and 80% on a 100-question test.

(b) If the test contains 250 questions, what is the probability that Jodi will score between 70% and 80%? You see that Jodi’s score on the longer test is more likely to be close to her “true score.”

To what extent should end users be involved in the selection of a database management system and database design?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

To what extent should end users be involved in the selection of a database management system and database design?

Your Project should be between 350-450 words and should have a clear main point that is well-developed. This is not a research Project and should rely instead on your own experience and observation, but note that you do not need to nor should you use first person.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

If you know someone who has overcome adversity in some way, you can help people in similar situations to also cross their own threshold through sharing this person’s act of courage with them. To do that, select a person you know and who you think is courageous. Then, write a three paragraph informative piece that helps your audience understand your definition of courage and shows your audience exactly how this person is in fact courageous, so they may also see a way through the adversity they are also facing. Be sure to explain exactly how this person crossed a threshold and explain how this person overcame adversity with specific examples and details to illustrate your point.

You might consider structuring these three paragraphs using this organizational plan:

Paragraph one – introduce the subject by providing your specific definition of courage. Do not rely on a definition from a source like the dictionary. Be sure that you introduce the person who has demonstrated this courage and establish a thesis that says why this person is courageous.
Paragraph two – select an appropriate event in this person’s life that best exemplifies how this person has displayed courage.
Paragraph three – analyze exactly why this event demonstrates courage and explore what adversity the person faced and how this demonstrates crossing a threshold. Make sure this paragraph ends with a clear conclusion.

Your Project should be between 350-450 words and should have a clear main point that is well-developed. This is not a research Project and should rely instead on your own experience and observation, but note that you do not need to nor should you use first person. You will be learning to locate and use research information in the upcoming units, but for now, rely on what you know.

Be sure to include an APA formatted title page and to follow the following formatting requirements:

12 point Times New Roman Font
Double spaced
One inch margins

Your report should comprise be in the form of a two page memo/document that discusses the regulations and how they will apply to your hiring process. THE STATE IS CALIFORNIA”.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

“You are a mid level manager for a large firm. You’ve been asked to hire 20 new employees for a new production line. Prior to execution, you must report to your district manager on what your plan is to work through the hiring process to ensure compliance on local, state, and federal regulations on Equal Opportunity in the workplace. Your report should comprise be in the form of a two page memo/document that discusses the regulations and how they will apply to your hiring process. THE STATE IS CALIFORNIA”.

The spread of industrialization in the 19th and early 20th centuries led to the development of new social problems in industrial economies. Describe some of these problems. Did industrialization create different opportunities and problems for men and women?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

The spread of industrialization in the 19th and early 20th centuries led to the development of new social problems in industrial economies. Describe some of these problems. Did industrialization create different opportunities and problems for men and women?

Discuss how and why the Ottoman and Qing Empires “modernized” in the 19th century. What problems and possible solutions did each of these empires develop in the face of “modernization”?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

Discuss how and why the Ottoman and Qing Empires “modernized” in the 19th century. What problems and possible solutions did each of these empires develop in the face of “modernization”?

What is the difference between “modernizing” and “Westernizing”?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

The Ottoman Empire and Qing China represent different paths older empires took as they entered the 19th century. For both empires, a major concern was finding the best means to “modernize.” What is the difference between “modernizing” and “Westernizing”?

List the different factors in mapping a total compensation strategy.

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

List the different factors in mapping a total compensation strategy.

As a manager, how would you decide how many workers to hire? What factors might play a role in your decision?

Is this your question too? Our experts can help you prepare an answer and you can learn from the assignment. You can email your assignment to assignment@tutehelp.com or Click Here to Instantly Upload Assignment Online or visit our Service Page to know more about us.

As a manager, how would you decide how many workers to hire? What factors might play a role in your decision?